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Munro Compleatists


Those who complete (compleat!) the Munros can record this fact and receive the magic number by writing in to The Clerk of The List (See here). Additionally, a list of current compleaters is published annually in the SMC Journal.
David Purchase - 643
Stob a'Choire Odhair - 03 June 1989


David has supplied us with interesting data concerning his compleation, which is reproduced here. David was the author of a well-received and very interesting paper in the SMC Journal ('The Classification of Mountains', SMCJ 1997, Vol.XXXVI, pp. 252-271), a revised version has also been published in Robin Campbell's book 'The Munroist's Companion':

David writes: 'I compleated on Stob a' Choire Odhair, a hill selected because Stob Ghabhar and Creise were climbed early in my Munroving days and this seemed a convenient and easy hill for my companions, some of whom were not experienced hillwalkers. Although my first Munro was climbed in 1965, by the end of 1979 I had visited only 19 and a few years later I decided that my objective was to climb all the Munros and Furths during the 1980s. As I neared the end a subsidiary objective emerged: to gain a compleation number lower than 666 (at which point, it was threatened at the time, recording might cease). Both these targets were achieved which, living in Bristol and then with a high-powered job, I did not think was too bad!

I was accompanied on the summit by 16 others including two Munroists (Bill Morrison, no. 368 and Jim Souness, no. 369, who compleated together in 1984). Ages ranged from 6 (my nephew) to 73 (my father). On the summit were no fewer than 8 actuaries (including, as well as myself, Bill, Jim and my father), which at the time was probably the largest ever gathering of actuaries on top of a Munro. I knew, of course, that several Scottish actuaries (including, as well as Bill and Jim, John Wallace, no. 379) were already Munroists, but believe that I was the first Fellow of the Institute of Actuaries (the English body) to record a compleation.

As an actuary I naturally kept statistical data during my round. I would be happy to share more information with anyone interested, but the main details are: Number of separate walks 152 Total distance walked 2,692 km (1,672 miles) Total height gained 171,000 m (562,000 feet, or 106 miles) Total walking time taken 950 hours (which seemed close to 40 days in the wilderness, i.e. 960 hours) Number of Munros which were unoccupied 191 (69%) Number of Munros from which I had a view 214 (78%)

These statistics are based on the 1980 total of 276 Munros, and count only walks which gained at least one new Munro. I included Beinn Teallach in the round without counting it, and was pleased (though not very surprised) to find that I had climbed all the 1997 promotions during my 1980s round. Although I have climbed some 75 Munros in a second round, I have no intention of attempting to compleat again, if only because my targets now extend to the whole of the British Isles (e.g. I have done the Donalds, and the Hewitts and Marilyns of England and Wales, and am half way through the Hewitts of Ireland). My lifetime ambition now is to climb 1,000,000 metres of ascent in my recorded hillwalking career: the total at the end of 2005 was 910,600 metres, and so the ambition is at least still possible. But to put this in context, 1,000 vertical kilometres is still less than one-sixth of the earth's radius.'


 
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