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Hill News

SMC / SMT Heightings Project Update - 16 September 2016
(Stob na Boine Druim-fhinn Survey)

For details of the SMC / SMT's heightings project see the 6 May 2016 new item. Below we present a further (null) finding from surveying commissioned for this project.

Surveys of Stob na Boine Druim-fhinn and its bealach (col) were carried out by G&J Surveys and the OS has accepted the data for inclusion on their future mapping.

  • Boine Druim-fhinn was measured on 6 May 2016 and found to be 658.37m (+/-0.05m).
  • Boine Druim-fhinn's highest bealach was measured on 6 May 2016 and found to be 508.78m (+/-0.07m).
  • Thus, the drop (relative height) was estimated to be 149.59 +/-0.09m on the day. However, it was estimated in very dry conditions the drop could increase by ~0.3m to 149.9m. (NB: It rains ~3days per week at the nearest weather station [average over 29 years].)

Therefore Stob na Boine Druim-fhinn does not have the required 150m of drop for it to qualify as a Graham.

You can read more about this survey in the official Stob na Boine Druim-fhinn survey report.

SMC / SMT Heightings Project Update - 5 July 2016
(Cnoc Coinnich, Cruach nan Capull and Cruach nam Mult Surveys)

For details of the SMC / SMT's heightings project see the 6 May 2016 new item. Below we present further outcomes from surveying commissioned for this project.

Official surveys of Cnoc Coinnich, Cruach nan Capull and Cruach nam Mult (all previously listed as Grahams) were carried out by G&J Surveys and the OS has accepted the data for inclusion on their future mapping.

  • Cnoc Coinnich was measured on 7 May 2016 and found to be 763.51m (+/-0.05m).
  • Cruach nan Capull was measured on 8 May 2016 and found to be 611.97m (+/-0.05m).
  • Cruach nam Mult was measured on 9 May 2016 and found to be 611.22m (+/-0.05m).

Thus Cnoc Coinnich is duly promoted to Corbett status whilst Cruach nan Capull and Cruach nam Mult remain Grahams.

You can read more about these surveys in the official Cnoc Coinnich, Cruach nan Capull and Cruach nam Mult surveys report.

SMC / SMT Heightings Project Update - 10 May 2016
(Beinn na h-Uamha, Corra-bheinn and Cruachan Dearg Surveys)

For details of the SMC / SMT's heightings project see the 6 May 2016 new item. Below we present further outcomes from surveying commissioned for this project.

Official surveys of Beinn na h-Uamha (Corbett), Corra-bheinn and Cruachan Dearg (twinned Grahams) were carried out by G&J Surveys and the OS has accepted the data for inclusion on their future mapping.

  • Beinn na h-Uamha was measured on 17 April 2016 and found to be 762.38m (+/-0.05m).
  • Corra-bheinn was measured on 19 April 2016 and found to be 704.94m (+/-0.05m).
  • Cruachan Dearg was measured on 19 April 2016 and found to be 704.08m (+/-0.05m).

Thus Beinn na h-Uamha remains a Corbett and Corra-bheinn can be considered a distinct Graham whilst Cruachan Dearg is no longer a (twinned) Graham. Poor Cruachan Dearg is now merely a hill of equal or more than 2000ft but less than 2500ft (~2310ft as it happens) with a prominence of less than 150m (~130m, if you're interested).

You can read more about these surveys in the official Beinn na h-Uamha, Corra-bheinn and Cruachan Dearg surveys report.

SMC / SMT Heightings Project - 6 May 2016
(Corwharn and Ladylea Hill and Meikle Millyea Surveys)

The Scottish Mountaineering Club (SMC), with funding from the Scottish Mountaineering Trust (SMT), have commissioned G&J Surveys to conduct surveys to accurately measure the heights of several Scottish mountains. The aim of the project is the resolution of anomalies that currently exist in several lists of hills that are of interest to the SMC (read about the various hill lists and view our guidebooks). Below we present the outcomes of the first surveys as part of this project.

Official surveys of Corwharn and Ladylea Hill (both listed as Grahams) were carried out by G&J Surveys and the OS has accepted the data for inclusion on their future mapping.

  • Corwharn was measured on 18 March 2016 and found to be 609.05m (+/-0.05m).
  • Ladylea Hill was measured on 19 March 2016 and found to be 609.08m (+/-0.05m).

Both Corwharn and Ladylea Hill will be shown as 609m on OS maps. The hills are both less than 2000ft (609.6m) so can therefore no longer be considered Grahams.

An official survey of Meikle Millyea (listed as a Donald) was carried out by G&J Surveys on 23 October 2015. There had previously been some confusion as to the position of the summit of this hill, with the OS (in their modern mapping) marking a spot height for the North East top only. The survey team recorded measurements for:

  • The South West Top (an embedded rock at NX 51617 82556) was measured to be 748.64m (+/-0.05m)
  • The North East Top (an embedded rock at NX 51831 82871) was measured to be 746.73m (+/-0.05m)

The South West Top of Meikle Millyea will now be considered the summit of this Donald. The OS has accepted the data and will amend their future maps.

You can read more about both surveys in the official survey reports:

Creag na Caillich (Tarmachans) and Carn na Caim South Top Surveys - 29 & 30 July 2015

Official surveys of the above two hills were carried out by G&J Surveys and the OS has accepted the data for inclusion on their future mapping. Creag na Caillich was measured on 29 July 2015 and found to be 914.3m (to be shown as 914m on OS maps) and therefore less than 3000ft, so this hill can therefore no longer be considered a Munro Top.

Carn na Caim South Top was measured on 30 July 2015 and found to be 914.6m which is over 3000ft (OS maps currently show 914m and will be amended to show 915m). This hill is passed en-route to or from Carn na Caim and after consideration the SMC has decided that there is merit in it becoming a Munro Top. After consultation with various people including the landowner and tenant farmer the name Mullach Coire nan Cisteachan is being applied to this hill.

See full details of both these surveys…

Knight’s Peak and Basteir Tooth Surveys - 23 Nov 2013

Following accurate measurement of the heights by G&J Surveys, and final corrections made by the Ordnance Survey, the summit of Knight’s Peak is the north spike at grid reference NG 47185 25415. Its height is 914.24m (2999.3ft). The nearby south spike is 914.16m. Knight’s Peak is therefore no longer a Munro Top. See full details of Knight's Peak Survey…

The summit of the Basteir Tooth is a solidly attached boulder at grid reference NG 46513 25268. The height of the Basteir Tooth is 917.16+/-0.06m. The Basteir Tooth is above 3000ft and so remains a Munro Top. See full details of Basteir Tooth Survey…

Twin Corbetts Separated - November 2012

The conjoined Corbetts, Buidhe Bheinn and Sgurr a’ Bhac Chaolais, are both given 885m by the Ordnance Survey. With a drop of 120m between the summits, both could not be Corbetts but they had been listed as a single entry with twin status.

A surveying team of John Barnard, Graham Jackson and Myrddyn Phillips (G and J Surveys) asked the SMC Committee if they would support a survey to measure accurately which was higher. Support was given, with the only condition being that the Ordnance Survey had to accept the result. Andy Nisbet and Dave McGimpsey accompanied the team in mid-September.

Both summits were surveyed simultaneously, using two GPS receivers, in order to give the most accurate result. Three hours of measurement from the highest rock (ignoring the cairn) were submitted to the OS for final correction, with the result that Buidhe Bheinn is 885.50m and Sgurr a’ Bhac Chaolais is 885.21m, plus or minus 0.05m.

Although Buidhe Bheinn is now the Corbett, the recommended walk is still to climb both, as it offers an unusual day of views into both Glen Shiel and Loch Hourn, and may persuade the enthusiast to ignore the 29cm.

The online Corbetts Table has been updated to reflect the results of the survey.

Demotion of Beinn a'Chlaidheimh (Fisherfield) - September 2012

And then there were 282… Following confirmation that the Ordnance Survey has adopted the height information from last year's independent survey of Beinn a'Chlaidheimh, The Scottish Mountaineering Club can confirm that, at 914m, the mountain falls short of the 914.4m height required to be considered a Munro. As a result it has had its relatively short lived Munro status rescinded. Up until 1974, following a new OS height for the mountain, Beinn a'Chlaidheimh had appeared on John Rooke Corbett's table of Scottish hills between 2500 feet and 3000 feet. The Scottish Mountaineering Club will therefore reinstate Beinn a'Chlaidheimh into Corbett's Tables; with the inclusion of this mountain and the other demoted Munro, Sgurr nan Ceannaichean, there are now 221 Corbetts.

The Munro's Table and Corbett's Table on the website have been updated and future publications of these Tables together with The Munros and The Corbetts books will also reflect this change.

We need hardly add that anyone who walks the mountains and hills of Scotland out of a love for their ambience will continue to appreciate this fine mountain regardless of the category the mountain finds its self placed.


 
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